/images/banners/app-update.jpg

New SunSmart app update

Have you seen the latest version of the SunSmart app?

With more than 600 locations across Australia – including live UV data from 12 major cities – the app helps you make it easier than ever to be SunSmart.

Find out what's new

/images/banners/work.png

Is your workplace SunSmart?

Now's the perfect time to lock in your health and safety training for the next financial year. SunSmart offers training and education for both indoor and outdoor workers, along with resources and support.

Learn about UV Safety Sessions

Welcome to SunSmart

Australia has one of the highest rates of melanoma diagnoses in the world. Two in three Australians will be diagnosed with skin cancer by the age of 70.

Best known for our iconic ‘Slip! Slop! Slap!’ campaign featuring Sid the Seagull, SunSmart has been working to change social norms relating to sun protection since 1981.

Our mission is to reduce skin cancer incidence, morbidity and mortality through a targeted prevention and early detection program. This is achieved through grassroots health promotion work that is underpinned by state-wide media campaigns. Our aim is to target priority populations and improve awareness, knowledge, attitudes and behaviour relating to UV exposure.

SunSmart is jointly funded by Cancer Council Victoria and the Victorian Government, and has been a World Health Organisation (WHO) Collaborating Centre for Radiation since 2004.

Facebook Facebook

Twitter Latest tweets

In the news

Children and educators get SunSmart as they head back to learn and play outdoors

Tuesday 13 October 2020

After months spent indoors during lockdown, Victorian educators flocked to online learning platform Generation SunSmart in record numbers to upskill in sun protection and be ready for rising UV levels as children return to school and early childhood services.

New study shows Victorians don’t understand when to use sun protection

Tuesday 1 September 2020

New research shows Victorians don’t understand the UV Index and mistakenly believe temperature and sunshine are the best predictors of the need for sun protection.

Share
Email Print Facebook Twitter AddThis